Equipment Requirements

look at here now Often, the first question Arrow of Light parents ask the Scoutmaster is “What equipment should I get for my son to join Boy Scouts?”

order topamax pills Answer – you likely need very little.  Start out with what you have and upgrade as the scouts interest in camping grows.  Scout equipment makes great birthday and Christmas gifts.  Here is a general list of stating items and how to upgrade them.

  • Full uniform – the only must have on the list.  A full uniform to Troop 342 is an official BSA shirt, pants, and belt.  Scout socks must be work with scout shorts but not required with pants. If your scout wants to wear a hat, it needs to be an official BSA item or one from any BSA camp/function. No neckerchief. Look in the scout room closet for a uniform before buying new.   Donate your old uniform for another.
  • Tent – LIkely the most expensive investment a scout will make is a tent. Wait for at least 1 year before purchasing one. Encourage your scout to observe what other boys are using and what he likes since there are many styles.  However, there are some characteristics to shop for in a tent.  Aluminum poles tend to be a little more durable than composite poles.  They might bend in high winds or with rough handling, but a bent pole can be wedged between a tree and straightened enough to use. Composites can break, more so in  cold weather. The rain fly is the most important.  FInd a tent that has a rain fly that extends to within a few inches of the ground.  This shields rain better and makes the tent more stable in wind. Some economy tents have a fly that is not much more than an umbrella floating on top of the tent.  In a hard rain, your scout would probably be better prepared with a good golf umbrella than one of these economy tents. Look for a fly that has a built in vestibule.  Shoes, dirty clothes, packs can be stored on the vestibule where they will be protected from weather yet still keep the dirt outside the tent. Expect to spend a little less than $200 for a tent with these features. The investment pays off on the first stormy night where you sleep soundly with no worries rather than up all night shining a flashlight on the growing pool of water in the low corner of the tent.
  • Sleeping bag – department store slumber bag and twin bed sheets work great for summer camp and warm weather camping. A lightweight down or poly fill 40 degree bag is the most popular choice for most scouts. 342 does enough cold weather camping, your scout may want a lightweight 0 degree bag later.  Although, a cheap slumber bag inside a 40 degree bag while wearing fleece sweatsuit will keep your scout just as warm.
  • Flashlight – start with whatever you have.  Most scouts like a elastic band LED headlamp powered with AAA batteries. Someone always has extra AAA batteries. One with 2 intensities along with a red lamp works great. Red color will not blind others when standing in a circle talking or wake everyone up at night when moving to the bathroom.
  • Backpack – Start with a heavy duty school pack.  These are generally large enough to hold a weekends items.  Most scouts move to a 55 or 65 liter frameless pack if they get into backpacking. Most boys also carry a lightweight day pack.  Just something to hold a bottle of water, some snacks, lunch and a few incidentals (pencil, paper, maps, compass, camera, what-not)
  • Sleeping Pad – a sleeping pad is a must for cool months camping in a tent.  It adds significant insulation between the body and the ground. There are many different models available to suit preferences.  All are good. But remember, a scout may carry this pad on hikes, so a lightweight pad would be a bonus.  Thermarest makes great products.
  • Clothing – quick dry shirts, shorts, and pants are great.
  • Shoes – Tennis shoes or sneakers are perfect.  Scouts that take a liking to hiking will want a pair of hiking shoes.  Sketchers make good ones in kids sizes.  Merrills are also popular. All shoes must be closed toe.  BSA policy. Crocks are great shoes for traveling to swim areas, canoe trips, showering and great to slip on/off at night for bathroom visits in the woods.